Lewis & Clark Law Review SYMPOSIUM: The Future of International Law in Indigenous Affairs: The Doctrine of Discovery, the United Nations, and the Organization of American States is now available.  Articles include: THE INTERNATIONAL LAW OF COLONIALISM: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS by Robert J. Miller;   RECONCEPTUALIZING TRIBAL RIGHTS: CAN SELF-DETERMINATION BE ACTUALIZED WITHIN THE U.S. CONSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURE? by Rebecca Tsosie; FINDING SUPPORT FOR A CHANGED PROPERTY DISCOURSE FOR AOTEAROA NEW ZEALAND IN THE UNITED NATIONS DECLARATION ON THE RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES by Jacinta Ruru; WHY ABORIGINAL TITLE IS A FEE SIMPLE ABSOLUTE by Michael C. Blumm; and THE DOCTRINE OF DISCOVERY AND THE ELUSIVE DEFINITION OF INDIAN TITLE by Blake A.
Watson.
 
The Public Nature of Indian Reservation Roads
(some initial thoughts)
by M. Brent Leonhard
 
Commonly Incorporated Federal Procurement Contract Clauses and What They Mean
by M. Brent Leonhard
This article is intended to be a simplistic practitioner’s tool for use in deciphering commonly incorporated Federal Acquisitions Regulation (FAR) provisions in federal procurement contracts. Included is a list of a few of them in sequential order as well as a brief, non-comprehensive explanation.
 
Legislative Assembly Works With Tribes
To Protect Rights and Health
by Michael D. Mason
The 74th Oregon Legislative Assembly passed or significantly amended legislation to address Tribal concerns or killed legislation to prevent harm to Tribes.
 
Articles
About the Indian Law Section
The goal of the Indian Law Section of the Oregon State Bar is to encourage a greater understanding and improve the practice of Indian law throughout Oregon. The ILS represents a wide spectrum of attorneys who handle cases, transactions and other matters involving Indian law, including attorneys in private practice, attorneys who work as in-house attorneys for Indian tribes, attorneys for non-profit organizations advocating for tribal rights, and attorneys who serve as tribal court judges for Indian tribes in Oregon. The ILS was organized in 1995 by practitioners working in Indian country in Oregon and is open to all members of the Bar as well as non-attorneys. Membership can include persons who are attorneys, tribal court judges, tribal leaders and tribal members, or anyone else interested in Indian law issues. The ILS currently has 170 members.
Page updated 04/11/12